Evacuated family dealing with San Jose flood taking it one day at a time

- As of late Thursday night, the Red Cross says at last count, there are 144 people staying at the James Lick High evacuation center and another ten at Evergreen High.

One evacuated family tells KTVU they are trying to take one day at a time, but says it's becoming increasingly difficult.

While dinner was being served at the evacuation center at Lick High, one couple and their 5-year-old daughter has been here since Tuesday.

They say they're worried about their future.

"What is going to happen with us? Where are we going to go?" asked Yemi Monteil who says she's experiencing mounting stress and depression, " My baby keeps saying I want to go home. What can I say? I don't have a home. I still have my stuff but I can't go there."

Yemi took cell phone video of her flooded street shortly before she was evacuated. She pointed to her car and her husband's both submerged in water.

"I see the video that I took . I said wow....I tried to get the car," says Yemi," My daughter says don't go ...don't go."
 
With no car, Yemi says she hasn't been able to take her Lizzlie to preschool and mom can't
go to work at a restaurant where she's a cashier.

"I'm afraid. I hope it doesn't happen like that. If it keeps this way, I think I'm going to lose my job," says Yemi.
Her husband Adrian Olivera is now relying on a friend to drive him to his job in Oakland as a construction worker.

"I'm worried. I leave my family here. We don't know what's happening here," says Adrian.
 
The couple says they're concerned about housing.

They say they still don't know if their apartment is going to be liveable and if so, when.

They pay $1,400 a month to rent a studio. Now, they're worried they may not be able to find something else affordable.
 
"We'll have case workers through the weekend," says Trevor Riggin, the regional chief executive officer for the American Red Cross.

He says case workers will be at the evacuation centers and in neighborhoods to address individual needs.

"How do you find permanent housing for folks that is affordable in the community...and that's really a one on one conversation with clients and it'll be different for every client," says Riggin.

He says the Red Cross is partnering with the city of San Jose and other nonprofits to come up with options.

As for Yemi Monteil, she hopes to get answers soon.

The videos she took while being rescued in a raft and of her flooded neighborhood...are lasting images she'd like to put behind her.

Yemi says she wants to be able to live in her apartment again if possible.
Despite their situation, she and her husband say they are grateful for all the help they've received during this difficult time.

As of late Thursday night, the Red Cross says at last count, there are 144 people staying at the James Lick

High evacuation center and another ten at Evergreen High.

One evacuated family tells KTVU they are trying to take one day at a time, but says it's becoming increasingly difficult.

While dinner was being served at the evacuation center at Lick High,

One couple and their 5-year-old daughter has been here since Tuesday.
They say they're worried about their future.

"What is going to happen with us ? Where are we going to go? asked Yemi Monteil who says she's experiencing mounting stress and depression, " My baby keeps saying I want to go home. What can I say ? I don't have a home. I still have my stuff but I can't go there."

Yemi took cell phone video of her flooded street shortly before she was evacuated.
She pointed to her car and her husband's....both submerged in water.

"I see the video that I took . I said wow....I tried to get the car," says Yemi," My daughter says don't go ...don't go."
 
With no car, Yemi says she hasn't been able to take her Lizzlie to preschool and mom can't
go to work at a restaurant where she's a cashier.
"I'm afraid. I hope it doesn't happen like that. If it keeps this way, I think I'm going to lose my job," says Yemi.
Her husband Adrian Olivera is now relying on a friend to drive him to his job in Oakland as a construction worker.
"I'm worried. I leave my family here. We don't know what's happening here," says Adrian.
 
The couple says they're concerned about housing.
They say they still don't know if their apartment is going to be liveable and if so, when.
They pay $1,400 a month to rent a studio. Now, they're worried they may not be able to find something else affordable.
 
"We'll have case workers through the weekend," says Trevor Riggin, the regional chief executive officer for the American Red Cross.
He says case workers will be at the evacuation centers and in neighborhoods to address individual needs.
"How do you find permanent housing for folks that is affordable in the community...and that's really a one on one coversation with clients and it'll be different for every client," says Riggin.
He says the Red Cross is partnering with the city of San Jose and other nonprofits to come up with options.
As for yemi monteil, she hopes to get answers soon.
The videos she took while being rescued in a raft and of her flooded neighborhood...are lasting images she'd like to put behind her.
Yemi says she wants to be able to live in her apartment again if possible.
Despite their situation, she and her husband say they are grateful for all the help they've received during this difficult time.

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