Honda airbag recall prompts owners to immediately stop driving

- Owners of several older model Hondas and Acuras are told to stop driving right now. A new recall said the older vehicles from 2001-2003 are too dangerous for the road, because the airbags have a 50 percent chance of exploding in a crash, sending metal fragments flying out. 


The vehicles affected are:

2001-2002 Honda Accords and Civics
2002-2003 Acura TL
2002 Honda CR-V
2002 Honda Odyssey
2003 Acura CL
2003 Honda Pilot

The recall surrounds the Takata airbag scandal. 14 deaths have been linked to the Takata airbags worldwide.
Federal regulators warn older Honda and Acura drivers to not drive their cars unless it’s to go to the dealership for repairs.

Honda posted a statement on its website promising to fix the problem free of charge, but an additional problem is how soon the affected vehicles can be repaired. KTVU called seven Bay Area dealerships, but none would say how long repairs would take or if they even have the parts. One Bay Area Honda dealership said it could be three or four weeks before the dealership has the airbag repair part.

Nohr’s Auto Brokers in Walnut Creek is reluctant to buy the old recalled Hondas until dealerships have the parts to fix the airbags.

“My understanding is that the new car dealers can’t sell these cars, because the part isn’t available,” said Pat Nohr.

Local dealers said humidity plays a factor in the airbag exploding, so southern states will get the repair parts first.

“The parts will be available to them first because they’re most at risk,” said Nohr.

One Bay Area dealership said if you can get your car in for an airbag repair, there’s a high probability you won’t receive a loaner vehicle, because dealerships don’t have the inventory since so many cars are affected.

Honda dealerships encourage drivers to call and supply the VIN to determine if their vehicle is on the recall list and if parts are available for their vehicle.

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