Teen hit, killed by train in San Leandro

- A junior at KIPP King Collegiate High School was fatally struck by a Union Pacific train in the San Lorenzo area of unincorporated Alameda County this morning, authorities said.

The boy was on his bike when the strike was reported at 8:06 a.m. in the vicinity of Grant and Railroad avenues, according to Aisha Knowles, a spokeswoman for the Alameda County Fire Department.

Investigators say both the teen and the train were both traveling southbound. 

"He was on that narrow bridge with not a lot of room on the side to kind of get out of the way. He was really overcome really quickly," says Alameda County sheriff's spokesman Sgt. Ray Kelly.  

The school is located nearby at 2005 Via Barrett roughly half a mile away from the scene of the accident. 

The boy was pronounced dead at the scene, according to Sgt. Kelly.

He was in the 11th grade, according to school officials.

The Alameda County coroner's bureau is not yet releasing the victim's name.

Visibly shaken and deeply heartbroken is Kelly Lara, principal of KIPP King Collegiate High School in San Lorenzo.  

"Our student was a beloved member of our 11th grade class and our entire school community.  He had a big heart. Our thoughts and prayers go out to his family," says Lara.  

Back at the school grief counselors are on hand, as the entire school community is saddened to lose a high school junior who they say had a big heart and close group of friends. "He will be incredibly missed, we're all incredibly heartbroken," says Lara.  

The train's engineer and conductor have been "put in touch" with peer counselors, according to Union Pacific spokesman Justin Jacobs.

"The safety message here is that pedestrians, and everyone, need to be very aware of the hazards associated with trains and should never be on the train tracks or attempt to cross anywhere other than at a designated crossing when signs and signals permit," Jacobs said in a statement.

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